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Discover the Dolomites

A unique territory

Where we are


If you want to find Val Badia on an atlas, you first need to find Italy – something rather easy to do since it has that peculiar boot shape smack in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. Look in the North, just farther up from Venice and Belluno, a bit left from Cortina d’Ampezzo – there! That’s exactly where Val Badia is!


Not much of a help? Well, then, just take a look at the map on the side here and click to zoom in directly on Google maps.


A closer look at Val Badia


Passo Gardena


Val Badia is one of the four Ladin valleys that branch off from the heart of the Dolomites – the Sella Massif – stretching in all four cardinal directions. Of these four valleys, Val Badia is the longest and the one farthest north. The area’s main access point is slightly south of the village of St. Lorenzen (San Lorenzo di Sebato), located in the center of the Puster Valley (Val Pusteria), not too far from the town of Bruneck.


The valley is easily accessible through the Dolomite passes in summer and in winter, although winter tires are highly recommended for safe transportation along the snow-covered mountain roads in winter.


The towns


Val Badia has 14 towns, including San Martino in Badia, Longiarù, Antermoia, Rina and Longega, as well as two hamlets in the neighboring valley of Marebbe – San Vigilio and Pieve di Marebbe – that are incorporated in the “Plan de Corones” tourist circuit.


Instead, the now famous and prestigious tourist resort of “Alta Badia” includes tourist spots in the upper part of Val Badia: La Valle, Badia, La Villa, San Cassiano, Corvara and Colfosco.


Ciastel de Tor



Getting there


The Dolomites are easy to reach from all directions thanks to several major European main roads such as the Brennero motorway and the Alemagna state road, and a well-developed network of internal roads that connect the Dolomite valleys to one another and to the numerous neighboring hamlets.


If you don’t have a car, there are many public and private transportation options that will easily take you to your destination in Val Badia and in the Dolomites. Holimites will help you plan your trip and take care of all the details – from airfares to airport transfers – so that you reach your destination safely and quickly.


Where Dolomiti 2


The easiest way to reach Val Badia is Provincial Road SP 244, that branches off south from the Val Pusteria “Strada del Sole” at San Lorenzo di Sebato. Once you leave Val Pusteria and you get onto the Val Badia road, the road ascends slightly through a kind of gorge. You go through 5 tunnels – roughly 10 km – before reaching the hamlet of Longega. The towns of San Vigilio and Pieve di Marebbe are located close by. If you continue on the main road, you fist reach San Martino in Badia and then the other towns in Alta Badia: La Valle, Badia, La Villa, San Cassiano, Corvara and Colfosco.


Val Badia can also be easily reached through the Falzarego and the Valparola Mountain Passes if you’re driving up from Cadore and Cortina d’Ampezzo, through the Campolongo Pass if you’re driving up the road that goes from Agordo to Alleghe and the Livinallongo Valley, or through the Gardena Pass if you plan to take the quickest route by driving on the road that from Chiusa goes up Val Gardena to Corvara.


Where Dolomiti 3


Whether you choose to reach Alta Badia by car or another form of transportation, Holimites is your ideal partner. We can offer advice and find the best solution for your needs, depending on your point of departure and destination.


Here are some links that will no doubt help you decide on how to get to Val Badia and facilitate your travel plans.


By car
We recommend that you use the Google Maps “route planner” so that you find the route that is best for you.

Important: Between November 15 and April 15, all vehicles circulating on the Dolomite road network must have snow tires or snow chains (mounted or equipped).


By train
Visit the Trenitalia website for Italian train timetables. The nearest train station is Brunico/Bruneck. From this train station there is a regular bus service to Val Badia.


By plane
The nearest airports are Bolzano (80 km), Innsbruck (127 km), Treviso (170 km), Venice (180 km), Verona (230 km), Milan Linate (360 km) and Milan Malpensa (390 km).


By bus
Click here for SAD local bus service timetables. There are also low-cost airport transfers from the Treviso, Venice and Bergamo airports. Contact us for further information and fees.


Getting around

Afew decades ago, getting around in the mountains could sometimes be an arduous task because of weather and/or road conditions. These problems are now a thing of the past. Even if you decide not to use your own car, moving from one town or from one valley to another is almost as easy as taking a city subway: the area features improved public and private transportation services, as well as the excellent services of an extensive ski-lift connection network that operates in both winter and summer.

To reach summer’s most beautiful destinations in Val Badia using the uphill lift systems, make sure to get the Alta Badia Mountain Pass or the Plan de Corones Ticket.


Sporting events


The Dolomites are home to an ever-increasing number of events. The magnificent background is particularly attractive for major sporting events broadcasted on television, but it offers something special to participants, as well.


Among the winter sporting events, Val Badia has a long tradition of hosting the FIS Ski World Cup circuit race on the “Gran Risa”: a difficult, technically challenging and rewarding ski slope that adapts well to hosting both giant and special slalom races.


In ski touring disciplines, another race other than the well-known “Sellaronda Skimarathon” (the ski competition by night around the Sella Massif) that is growing in number of participants is the “Tour de Sas”, a ski mountaineering competition that started in recent years and quickly garnered it a place in the renowned “Coppa delle Dolomiti” alpine ski circuit. It circles around the “Sasso della Croce”, starting and ending in San Leonardo in Badia.


Sellaronda Skimarathon


The “Maratona dles Dolomites” is the most prestigious summer sporting event, attracting numerous cyclists and international enthusiasm. It is the only Italian cycling marathon (granfondo) that receives several hours of live coverage on national television networks. The “Maratona dles Dolomites” was initially the idea of cycling enthusiasts in Val Badia and, since its first edition in 1987 with 166 contestants, it boasted 9,500 competitors in 2012; there’s no need to point out the extraordinary nature of the event, considering that more than 20,000 requests to participate were declined due to safety concerns along the route.


Maratona dles Dolomites


Other cycling competitions similar to the famous “Maratona dles Dolomites” have also sprung up, such as the very successful “Sellaronda Hero”, a MTB race around the Sella Massif that starts and ends in Selva di Val Gardena.


The Sellaronda Bike Day event is a must for all cycling enthusiasts – bicycle tourists, amateurs and professional competitors alike. The event takes place on two different days – one at the beginning and one at the end of summer – when all the roads on the world-famous Dolomite passes are closed to all motorized traffic and reserved only for cyclists. Passo Gardena, Passo Sella, Passo Pordoi and Passo Campolongo have in recent years become the meeting place for over 6,000 cyclists that on average participate at the event.

Giro Plan de Corones

Holimites is a tour operator specializing in sport activities and events in the Dolomites. It is the ideal partner for finding the information you need in real time. Holimites can also help you find rooms and accommodations during peak periods like the events mentioned here, when it is most difficult to find lodgings curtailed to your individual needs.


If you’re considering participating in any of these events, contact us: we’ll provide all the help you need to make your visit in Val Badia truly unforgettable!



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